For many musicians, there are few things in life that can be compared to the incredible and inexplicable feeling of a live performance. All the time spent in the practice room, the hustle booking one or several gigs, and then the rush of feelings and sensations right before walking on stage. It is all a long process that many end up enjoying as soon as the music starts flowing and the musicians enter a supernatural state of being.

Photo by Nicole Honeywill

Live performance is what drives many of us to keep creating music and keep dreaming for bigger and better projects; and it is also one of the most influential forms of promotion for any band, or solo artist. Performances are necessary to any musical act to publicly showcase original work, display proficiency on any musical instrument, and highlight entertaining skills as well. It can be considered to be the best way to create strong and lasting bonds with the audiences that are hungry for entertainment.

 

The power of live music is not a secret for anybody. Ask yourselves why bands like The Rolling Stones, and Aerosmith are still touring around the world (yes, it makes them millions of dollars, but it also keeps them relevant in today’s changing music market). A lot of musicians know and have identified this as an asset that needs to be exploited in order to grow and create a true following. So when it comes to the performance itself, many prepare the music, (some) prepare the show, but why do most musicians do not ideate some kind of promotion/quality control strategy to execute during their show?

It is a critical moment that musicians are not taking advantage off, and unfortunately there is not one concrete answer on how to do it. But there is something that musicians have that can make a difference for the next live performance: friends.

For the next live performance, make sure to bring one or two friends that are willing and eager to help out, and ask them to do a series of these four easy but powerful tasks:

Photo by Nathan Nichols
Count the number of attendees

Knowing how many people are experiencing your live performance is important to understand how much your following has increased over time, to identify if the venue is the right place to showcase your music, and to consider how many people will go out to tell their friends about you.

Identify reactions to the performance

It is not a hard task to look at someone’s face and body language to know if they like or dislike the show. Pay attention to the audience’s reactions in key parts of the show so the musicians can later rehearse and polish their show. That is what quality control is all about.

Promote the band’s Social Media accounts

This can be done in various ways: flyers, word of mouth, etc. This will help the musicians focus on the performance and will eliminate the typical mic call saying   “guys, follow us on Instagram @…” that not a lot of people actually follow. Having a direct interaction causes greater effect (which leads us to the next point). Check this post to advance your social media presence: Advertisement in Social Media: “Like” vs “Share”

Have a solid group of 10-15 friends that go to the Gig

Usually, people will be willing to follow something that others are already following. Bringing a good amount of close friends will also show the new audiences that there are already followers and people that believe in the band’s music and message.

Photo by Maxime Lebrun

These are just a handful of benefits when bringing a friend over. Many new ideas can arise from this point on, and it is important to keep looking for easy tasks that can help the band better understand how people are connecting to the show and their music. If you would like to connect with music industry professionals, and other musicians to share this knowledge, make sure to join Stereotheque. So for the next gig, make sure to bring someone over that will look out for these easy but powerful tasks while the band focuses on stage.

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